How To Articulate Your Accomplishments for Your Performance Review

It’s hard to believe we’re nearing the end of the year. For me, it seems like just yesterday it was the end of summer and fall was in the air. Reality check; it’s December and that typically means annual performance review time.

writers-block-atlantic-webworks

For most of us, this time of year can be stressful as we try to document our performance by reflecting back on our contributions and accomplishments. In larger organizations it doesn’t just stop at individual performance assessments. Calibration sessions are held to compare you against others across departments to justify ratings. So it’s important to take time to clearly and succinctly illustrate how you delivered against your goals. One of the most important questions you, as an employee, need to be able to answer during your performance review is…Why should you get the rating you are asking for? If you are self-managed, a Telecommuter,  or didn’t have an “active” Manager work with you through the year, it’s even more important to use examples to build your case. Managers don’t always have insight into your accomplishments or remember feedback from others. It’s up to you to weave them into your performance assessment in a meaningful and appropriate way.

Here are a few suggestions to help you document your annual accomplishments and deliverables to position the rating you want:

  1. Build a habit of documenting your accomplishments throughout the year: As an employee it’s a good practice to keep email_folderstrack of the work and successes you’ve had throughout the year. If you wait until mid-year or year end to try and recall your deliverables you may forget important accomplishments. Here are few things you can do track throughout the year:
    1. Use Email Folders: If you get feedback via email take moment to create a performance folder in your email system. That way you can file your feedback through the year and pull it out to refresh your memory when you’re ready to start writing your assessment.
    2. Use your Performance system: If you have an ERP/performance system, book a 15 minute meeting in your calendar each month to update accomplishments against your goals. You can then pare down your contributions during your mid-year and annual review.

     

  2. Use specific examples to articulate how your work mapped back to your goals: Goals are formulated according to Create-Smart-Goals

S.M.A.R.T (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timely) principles. As such they are typically broad. Use specific examples of your deliverables (specific results) as evidence on how you met and/or exceeded your goals. Let’s look at an example:

Goal: Expand Managers knowledge of social media sourcing options

Documenting deliverable option 1: Through conversations with Managers I spoke with them about social media to help educate them on sourcing effectiveness. Many of the Managers I work with now use social media as a sourcing option for their vacancies.

Documenting deliverable option 2: During my intake conversations with Managers I took some time to speak to them about using social media as a viable sourcing option. I used a variety of approaches to help show them why social media was an important avenue to source. An example of how I achieved this was working with Manager X for the RequisitionTitle.

Manager X had traditionally used job boards and staffing agencies to attract candidates for their role. Through my partnership and advice I worked with Manager X to position how we could use social media as a sourcing option for their role. During my intake conversation I worked with Manager X to get a thorough understanding of the requirements of the candidate profile. Once we had agreement, I showed them how I could generate a list of potential candidates within minutes through a LinkedIn search based on those criteria. I showed Manager X how the targeted search brought back relevant, qualified individuals rather than waiting and relying on applicants which we would later have to screen into the candidate pool. I also supplemented this approach by sharing our job aides with Manager X on how they could use their LinkedIn, Facebook and/or Twitter accounts to cross share their job to their network. I also suggested ways they could identify people within their network as viable candidates we may want to contact.

As a result of our social media approach we ended up hiring a candidate from LinkedIn. At the end of the process I asked Manager X about their experience using social media as a viable sourcing channel. They were pleasantly surprised by the results and were appreciative to learn about newer ways to find ideal candidates. Manager X is now a convert, and will use social media as viable sourcing channels for upcoming vacancies. This was also reflected in the survey feedback I received from Manager X. Manager X also sent an email (see attachment) expressing their thanks for my guidance and time in utilizing new and innovative approaches to sourcing.

So, in two examples above, the first option speaks to how the goal was met. However it doesn’t provide any specific examples on how it was met. This makes your assessment subjective. The second option provides a more detailed approach to articulating how the deliverable was met. By outlining how you approached the situation, showing the before and after, then backing it up with some  metrics/feedback, it makes your assessment objective. The last sentence also wove in the email feedback relevant to the example provided.

good_job
3.      Demonstrate how you’ve taken feedback to improve: Always make a point of regularly asking your Manager for feedback. There two reasons for this. First, if there are areas for improvement you want an opportunity to have time to address it. Secondly, if there aren’t any areas for improvement it should serve as confirmation you are carrying out your goals and deliverables well. There shouldn’t be any surprises at year-end. In your annual assessment use some specific examples to show how you’ve incorporated constructive feedback and/or coaching to improve. Not only does it show a positive attitude, it also shows your wi


4.     
Showcase your star performance through your summary:  You are your best PR 

star_performer

person. You have to do a good job of  selling your own performance. Managers rely on this as they need good examples to take into calibration sessions. Each year should be seen as a journey of your learning, development and accomplishments. Use the summary section of your performance assessment as a reflection of  one key item against each of these buckets during the past year. Remember use specific exampl


I hope these few tips will help you build the confidence to document your deliverables, accomplishments and fantastic feedback in an appropriate way that is easy for both you and your Manager to use in your performance review

I wish you good luck and all the very best for the New Year ahead!

By Ann Barrett; Director, eRecruitment & Social Media Strategy

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About sailorannzalie

Talent Brand Expert, Recruiter, Social Media Expert, Integration Architect, Consultant. I’ve had lots of titles, but the ones that describe me the best are Change Agent. Transformer. Game Changer. Throughout my career I’ve had a number of challenging and rewarding jobs. I’ve had the opportunity to build, develop and lead creative initiatives that transform customer and employee experiences. I’ve consulted with clients across the globe and worked out off offices in Europe, North America and Asia. I am consumer and contributor. I love to learn from others and of course, share my knowledge through my blog https://sailorann.wordpress.com. As an industry thought leader I’ve spoken multiple times at LinkedIn’s Talent Connect, Indeed’s first global conference and the Social Capabilities Network (SCN). I’ve been recognized for my work and most recently was the proud recipient of the 2013 Social Media Recruitment Award. When I’m off the clock I like to broaden my horizons by travelling the world and experiencing new cultures. Want to hear about my travel adventures? Check out my travel blog: www.mytb.org/Sailorann

3 thoughts on “How To Articulate Your Accomplishments for Your Performance Review

    • Hi Sankar,

      Happy New year! Hope you had a wonderful vacation 🙂 There should be a share button for LinkedIn at the end of the article. I just checked and I can see it.

      Thank so much for your nice comments. Looking forward to chatting in the next few weeks!

  1. Here’s a tip for anyone with Sametime (or something like that) at work. Instead of posting status updates saying that you’re working from home, or going to a doctor’s appointment, or in the Toronto office today, use it to let folks know what projects you’re currently working on. People in your network may jump in (as I’ve discovered) and give you some timely input. But best of all, when it comes time to list all your accomplishments at the end of the year, you don’t have to tax your memory. Just go back and look at your posting log! Smart, eh? 🙂

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